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NASA's ARIA Team Maps California Quake Damage

13 July 2019

A week after two strong earthquakes struck near the city of Ridgecrest in Southern California, NASA scientists and engineers continue to analyze satellite data for information on fault slips and ruptures. Their observations are helping local authorities assess damage and will also provide useful information to engineers for designing resilient structures that can withstand ruptures like the ones created by the latest quakes.

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Using satellite information to help rebuild after a disaster

12 July 2019

ESA and the Asian Development Bank have joined forces to help the Indonesian government use satellite information to guide the redevelopment following the earthquake and tsunami that devastated the provincial capital of Palu and surroundings last year.

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Modelling tides in the Arctic Ocean

11 July 2019

We are all aware of the ebb and flow of the tide every day, but understanding tidal flow is important for a range of maritime activities and environmental monitoring, such as search and rescue operations, shipping routes and coastal erosion. The Arctic Ocean tides are particularly difficult to understand, but a new tidal model produced using ESA satellite data may shed some light on what is happening in this remote area.

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Copernicus Sentinels improve monitoring of coastal ecosystems

11 July 2019

An early detection of changing patterns and altering ecosystems in coastal wetlands can prevent irreversible biodiversity loss and assist in the identification of problematic areas. The Copernicus Sentinel missions are now providing vital information to help visualise and explain trends to policy makers.

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NASA Satellites Find Biggest Seaweed Bloom in the World

08 July 2019

An unprecedented belt of brown algae stretches from West Africa to the Gulf of Mexico—and it's likely here to stay. Scientists at the University of South Florida in St. Petersburg's College of Marine Science used NASA satellite observations to discover and document the largest bloom of macroalgae in the world, dubbed the Great Atlantic Sargassum Belt, as reported in Science.

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Managing Freshwater Across the United States

05 July 2019

The varied landscapes of the United States have unique relationships with water. On the East Coast, rain is a regular occurrence. In the West, drought is a constant threat. Rivers and lakes fed by rainfall, snowmelt or a mix of both provide two-thirds of the country's drinking water while also supporting agriculture.

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What’s happening to Greenland’s ice?

05 July 2019

Heatwave conditions catapulted Greenland into an early Arctic summer in June, prompting widespread melting across its icesheet surface, according to researchers at the Danish Meteorological Institute.

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Copernicus Sentinel-2 helps to safeguard mountain pastoral systems

28 June 2019

The Peneda-Gerês National Park in northeast Portugal has been home to wild ponies for around 2500 years. Today, it also provides a rich habitat for wolves, foxes, wild boars, ibex, and deer. It also hosts otters, fish, frogs, salamanders, 147 different bird species (many migratory) and 15 bat species. Data from the Copernicus Sentinel-2 satellites are helping to safeguard this mountainous habitat.

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Satellites to the rescue after natural disasters

28 June 2019

Natural disasters showcase the widespread utility of satellite imagery. After earthquakes, landslides, hurricanes and floods, government agencies, nonprofits and emergency responders often turn to electro optical and radar imagery to gauge the severity of the damage, plan rescues, deliver aid and begin rebuilding campaigns.

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A new way of Land Cover Mapping on a global scale

27 June 2019

The globalisation of the world's economy and the increase of its population has significant environmental consequences and puts pressure on land management the like of which has never been seen before. The health of our land is a foundation for economic activities as well as for the preservation of our ecosystems.

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The Water Future of Earth's 'Third Pole'

26 June 2019

Himalaya. Karakoram. Hindu Kush. The names of Asia's high mountain ranges conjure up adventure to those living far away, but for more than a billion people, these are the names of their most reliable water source.

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Copernicus - Eyes on the EU’s external borders

21 June 2019

Frontex is one of the institutions entrusted by the European Commission with the implementation of the Copernicus programme. As a Copernicus Entrusted Entity, Frontex is responsible for the border surveillance component of the Copernicus Security Service.

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Looking For Freshwater In All the Snowy Places

20 June 2019

Snowflakes that cover mountains or linger under tree canopies are a vital freshwater resource for over a billion people around the world. To help determine how much freshwater is stored in snow, a team of NASA-funded researchers is creating a computer-based tool that simulates the best way to detect snow and measure its water content from space.

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Earth's freshwater future: extremes of flood and drought

13 June 2019

NASA satellites are a prominent tool for accounting for water, as it constantly cycles from water vapour to rain and snow falling onto soils, and across and beneath the landscape. As Earth's atmosphere warms due to greenhouse gases and the satellite data record continues to get longer and more detailed, scientists are studying how climate change is affecting the distribution of water.

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Mapping our global human footprint

12 June 2019

The number of people flocking to cities in search of employment and better prospects is growing at an unprecedented rate. By 2050, the global population is estimated to reach nine billion, 70% of which will be living in urban areas. The World Settlement Footprint 2015 (WSF-2015) is the first map, using mass collections of radar and optical satellite imagery, to provide a global overview of the world's human settlements.

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Satellites and drones to support railway infrastructure maintenance

08 June 2019

The MOMIT project aims at developing and demonstrating a new use of remote sensing technologies for railway infrastructure monitoring. Here, Valeria Donzelli, Project Coordinator, explains how the solutions to come from the project will support the maintenance and prevention processes within the infrastructure management lifecycle.

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Swiss Environment Goes Under Close Watch

07 June 2019

The Swiss Data Cube (SDC) is an innovative technology that gathers all available satellite images from the American Landsat program and the European Sentinel 1 and 2.

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Temperature maps from space would 'boost crop production'

07 June 2019

Scientists are developing a satellite system to record the temperatures of individual fields of crops.

The aim is to survey land temperatures to estimate water-use by plants and to show how they transfer that water back to the atmosphere.

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Antarctic glaciers named after satellites

07 June 2019

Dramatic changes in the shape of the Antarctic ice sheet have become emblematic of the climate crisis. And, in deference to the critical role that satellites play in measuring and monitoring Antarctic glaciology, seven areas of fast-flowing ice on the Antarctic Peninsula have been named after Earth observation satellites.

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Looking into changes in European landscapes with the Copernicus Land Monitoring Service

06 June 2019

Land is the foundation of our society and an extremely important source of economic activity. Land is also vital for filtering our water and hosting the biodiversity that helps sustain our livelihood. Efficient land monitoring is crucial to ensure rational and sustainable use of this precious resource.

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