Minimize Research and Application News
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Four decades of sea ice from space: The beginning

03 September 2014

One of the most visible signs of climate change in recent years was not even visible at all until a few decades ago.

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Radar vision maps Napa Valley earthquake

02 September 2014

Sentinel-1A has added yet another string to its bow. Radar images from this fledgling satellite have been used to map the rupture caused by the biggest earthquake that has shaken northern California in 25 years.

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Antarctic sea-level rising faster than global rate

01 September 2014

A new study of satellite data from the last 19 years reveals that fresh water from melting glaciers has caused the sea-level around the coast of Antarctica to rise by 2cm more than the global average of 6cm.

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NASA radar system surveys Napa Valley quake area

29 August 2014

NASA scientists are planning to conduct an airborne survey of earthquake fault displacements in the Napa Valley area of Northern California, using a sophisticated radar system developed by NASA's Jet propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena, California.

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Unique database of satellite images of Russia exceeds 3.5 million items

28 August 2014

A database of images of Russia made from space has reached more than 3.5 million pictures, a representative of Russia's SCANEX Research and Development Center told RIA Novosti on Thursday.

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Ozone-depleting compound persists, NASA research shows

20 August 2014

NASA research shows Earth's atmosphere contains an unexpectedly large amount of an ozone-depleting compound from an unknown source decades after the compound was banned worldwide.

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Using GPS to improve tropical cyclone forecasts

20 August 2014

One of the challenges in forecasting tropical cyclones is that measuring atmospheric conditions over the open ocean is extremely difficult. New research indicates that the COSMIC microsatellite system, which uses a technology known as GPS radio occultation to observe remote regions of the atmosphere, can significantly improve predictions of tropical cyclones.

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Summer of research to improve hurricane forecasting

19 August 2014

This summer, NOAA scientists and partners are launching a number of new unmanned aircraft and water vehicles to collect weather information as part of a coordinated effort to improve hurricane forecasts.

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Snow cover on Arctic sea ice has thinned 30 to 50 percent

15 August 2014

New research led by NASA and the University of Washington, Seattle, confirms that springtime snow on sea ice in the Arctic has thinned significantly in the last 50 years, by about a third in the Western Hemisphere and by half near Alaska.

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UNOSAT rapid mapping activated over flooding in Sudan

15 August 2014

The rainy season in Sudan has begun with severe flooding in Sudan including the capital city. The last devastating floods of 2013 are still fresh in the memory of the Sudanese and the humanitarian community and yet the new rainy season has brought more displacement and destruction right from its start.

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Why do La Nina events linger?

12 August 2014

For millions of people, the onset of El Niño or La Niña in northern autumn indicates whether they're likely to face unusually warm, cold, wet, or dry conditions over the coming winter. A new modelling study pins down the process that apparently determines why La Niña events often last twice as long as typical El Niño events-a result with major implications for seasonal predictions extending more than a year out.

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From pole to pole, NASA flying laboratories study our world

08 August 2014

NASA gains its global perspective of Earth through its fleet of 17 satellites orbiting our home planet. But sometimes scientists need to add a closer view to tackle certain challenging questions.

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Study of aerosols stands to improve climate models

05 August 2014

Of all the factors that influence Earth's changing climate, the effect that tiny particles in Earth's atmosphere called aerosols have on clouds is the least well understood. Aerosols scatter and absorb incoming sunlight and affect the formation and properties of clouds.

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Climate change research goes to the extremes

30 July 2014

By now, most sci­en­tists-97 per­cent of them, to be exact-agree that the tem­per­a­ture of the planet is rising and that the increase is due to human activ­i­ties such as fossil fuel use and defor­esta­tion. But until recently, the jury was still out regarding the vari­ability sur­rounding that increase-for example, how much dif­fer­ence there will be between the hottest hot days from one year to the next, as well as with each year's coldest cold days.

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New NASA studies to examine climate/vegetation links

30 July 2014

NASA has selected proposals for two new instruments, including one from NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, that will observe changes in global vegetation from the International Space Station. The sensors will give scientists new ways to see how forests and ecosystems are affected by changes in climate or in land use.

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Monitoring water quality down under

28 July 2014

Former Copernicus Masters competition winner EOMAP has launched a new web-based application that provides daily maps of Australia's coastal water quality.

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Satellite study reveals parched U.S. west using up underground water

24 July 2014

A new study by NASA and University of California, Irvine, scientists finds more than 75 percent of the water loss in the drought-stricken Colorado River Basin since late 2004 came from underground resources. The extent of groundwater loss may pose a greater threat to the water supply of the western United States than previously thought.

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Quiet year expected for Amazon forest fires in 2014

22 July 2014

Researchers at NASA and the University of California, Irvine, using a variety of satellite data, expect Amazon forests this year to see a below-average wildfire season. The fire season in this region of South America typically begins in May, peaks in September and ends in January.

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Water, water - Not everywhere: Mapping water trends for African maize

21 July 2014

Today's food production relies heavily on irrigation, but across sub-Saharan Africa only 4 percent of cultivated land is irrigated, compared with a global average of 18 percent. Small-scale farming is the main livelihood for many people in the region, who depend on rainfall to water their crops.

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What's the deal with 3DEP?

17 July 2014

The USGS, along with other federal, state, local and private agencies is establishing a new 3D Elevation Program (3DEP) designed to respond to the growing needs for three-dimensional mapping data of the United States. This coordinated partnership can help meet the country's needs for high-quality, 3D elevation data.

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